Why QAnon Has Attracted So Many White Evangelicals

By FiveThirtyEight - March 5, 2021

One week after his first drop, Q was already quoting scripture. “The LORD is my shepherd, I lack nothing,” Q posted on the imageboard site 4chan. The line was from Psalm 23, possibly the most well-known of the 150 psalms, and a beacon of hope for Christians going through challenging times. Is it any wonder that the fringe conspiracy theory QAnon has attracted true believers in every sense of the word?


QAnon revolves around the baseless belief that former President Donald Trump is fighting a secret war against a global cabal of Democratic elites who are Satan-worshipping, cannibalistic pedophiles. Much of the lore comes from online posts, called “drops,” written by an anonymous person known as “Q” who claims to have insider knowledge.

As the QAnon movement has become more culturally significant — QAnon believers were among those who took part in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol building — surveys have attempted to identify just how many Americans believe in this conspiracy. While that picture is still murky, it’s become increasingly apparent that this movement has attracted a significant number of white evangelical Christians, which could have implications for the movement’s future. Evangelicals, after all, played an important role in shoring up the Tea Party’s growth and influence.

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The video below isn’t directly related to the article but contains relevant information about the topic.

Evangelical leaders try to take on QAnon in their community
CBS News
Jun 30, 2020
5 min, 23 sec

Some evangelical leaders are trying to fight back against online conspiracies gaining popularity in their ranks. Sarah Poster, a reporting fellow at Type Investigations and the author of “Unholy: Why White Evangelicals Worship at the Altar of Donald Trump,” spoke to “Red and Blue” host Elaine Quijano about why QAnon has become so pervasive among many religious Republicans.

Tags: Qanon